Posts in category: Ethics

Seeing patterns

Seeing patterns

The ability to see patterns is a powerful tool to understand complexity and innovate. The problem sometimes is not such much of ability as that of not getting to the optimal vantage point. Example: Rhett Dashwood’s Google Earth Alphabet. I believe we are wired to see...

Growth

Whenever most people think of growth in business, they think of more people, bigger premises, more branches, a larger slice of the market, and of course more profits. If you were a big business, you may have little choice but to think only of these aspects. That is...

Complex richness from simple baselines

Consider: It only takes your monitor (and TVs and projectors) three base colours (red, green and blue) to reproduce the endless of shades of colours that our eyes can see. It only takes four elements (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen) to construct all life on...

Regardless of the technology, human nature still rules

This post was sparked by this Economist article: Invisible sieve: Hidden, especially for you. Personalisation induced filter bubbles may be cocooning us in our own isolated universes, linking us only to those people like us, who hold similar (and non-challenging)...

T-shaped people and Building Information Modelling

Interesting points in this Design Intelligence article about the need for T-shaped deep generalists in architectural practice. I think these are equally applicable to any business that works on complex projects that cross multiple technical disciplines. Oh wait,...

Mental spring-clean

When you don’t have a permanent home, you become very aware of the stuff you carry around with you. Carting around loads of physical baggage wears thin very quickly when travelling, or moving inter-state, or across countries. You quickly learn to be detached from...
A historical lesson in taste

A historical lesson in taste

Have you ever wondered why historical artefacts are always so tastefully neutral-toned? Less is more! Perhaps lurid bad taste is a persistent human condition… The interesting point here is this: persistent exposure to one concept (in this case “how historical...

Acknowledgement

Here’s an idea for a website, or a Facebook app… You describe how some stranger or distant associate whom you don’t know that well has really helped you a long time ago. You acknowledge celebrate what they have done for you. Maybe this will become a way to...

Is playing movies to demo laptops unethical?

It seems that all electronic retailers these days use movies to showcase their laptops. Movies are an easy way to attract attention, and also potentially hide many potential flaws in the display – flaws that would directly affect the use of these machines for work...

When is marketing irresponsible?

Marketing is irresponsible when it perpetuates simplistic myths that perpetuates ignorance and causes damage to customers in the long run. Apple and its fans have long spouted how the MacOS operating system is totally safe. How it’s all automated. How users won’t need...

Low hanging fruit in a high-stress world

I find many popular games boring. Facebook’s Farmville, that cafe one, and Tap Zoo just to name a few. These games all have similar traits. Traits that remind me of Tomagochi. Repetitive tasks that build towards simple, clear goals. Tasks with immediate...
Dove integrity fail

Dove integrity fail

I ran into a chemist the other day to grab a stick of deodorant. Dove is ok – or so I thought. They are the more socially progressive brand – notable for their ‘Real Beauty’ campaign that featured normal-looking women, and the retouching piece on...

Should we expect more from entrepreneurship?

This post is triggered by this article in the Sydney Morning Herald. On one hand I admire and applaud the entrepreneurship. The ability to spot or create an opportunity and then take advantage of it. On the other hand, I can’t help but cringe at the lack of any deep...

Liberal vs conservative brains

Liberals have more gray matter in a part of the brain associated with understanding complexity, while the conservative brain is bigger in the section related to processing fear. A study by Ryota Kanai of the University College London found that conservative brains are...
Hiring designers for non-design roles; who dares, wins!

Hiring designers for non-design roles; who dares, wins!

There’s a lot and lot of talk about innovation and design thinking being crucial to helping a business respond to rapid and dramatic change. Large businesses have engaged large design companies like Continuum and IDEO, design companies who have reinvented their...

Is balance a myth?

RANT: I know people mean well, and they like to think they know what my problems are, and therefore want to fix it for me. I do appreciate the intentions… But I am sick and tired of people telling me I need more balance in my life. As if somehow I can just push a...

Superstition kills curiosity

Curiosity, the ability ask “Why?” and “Why not?”; the willingness to set aside our ego, our self-importance and admit to not knowing something, the openness to all possibilities when we are in a state of not knowing – this is the basis for innovation. Curiosity thus...
Six Steps To Getting Results With Innovation

Six Steps To Getting Results With Innovation

My friend Margaret Manson, the aptly titled Chief Inspirator from Global Trendz Marketing, has put together an innovate virtual conference called “Six Steps To Getting Results With Innovation”. The goal of the conference is to take business leaders through...
The impetus to change in times of comfort

The impetus to change in times of comfort

Change is constant and all that – and more often than not, externally imposed. An immediately threatening situation arises, and so we make decisions, set up a course of action, and action that. Very few organisation (or individuals), no matter how “change embracing”,...

Too incompetent to know your own incompetence?

The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled people make poor decisions and reach erroneous conclusions, but their incompetence denies them the metacognitive ability to appreciate their mistakes. From Wikipedia. This seems to be more pronounced in...
Page 5 of 11« First...34567...10...Last »