Posts in category: Engagement

Perceptive relativity

Perceptive relativity

(Image: Wikimedia Commons) I was sitting at the lights recently watching a plane coming in to land overhead. There was clearly a steady crosswind as I could see the plane drifting an astonishingly long distance sideways. From inside the cabin, this sideways motion is...

UX/UI for internal vs public users

The UX/UI design context can vary depending on whether the expected end users of a given application are internal staff or the general public. INTERNAL (Specialised) Users PUBLIC (External) Users Example:Tax Office intranet audit application. Example:Web-based income...

UI, UX, IA and gamification in context

Everything we use – including software applications, machinery/equipment, and processes/services – has a User Experience (UX) component. The user experience of a product or service is what the user feels, thinks and experiences in the course of interacting with this...
User-centred design mindset

User-centred design mindset

Underlying any effective user-centred designer is the fundamental desire to be of service. Understanding derived from empathy drives truly insightful requirements gathering. What is it really like for the user? How do they feel? What do they want? What are they afraid...

Manifesting UX

The user experience (of a product or service) manifests through three aspects: the user interface (UI), the information architecture (IA) and the presentation design (PD). UX User Experience UIUser Interface IAInformation Architecture PDPresentation Design Means...

UI design vs user training

We consciously design applications and info systems to suit our needs and proclivities. In the course of using a system, we also modify our behaviour to accommodate the system; such as learning the keyboard shortcuts. Improving a user interface is an on-going dynamic...
Unbox and reveal in UX design

Unbox and reveal in UX design

What the user experiences when unwrapping a product is part and parcel of the product/brand’s total user experience. Image from Wikimedia.org Architects for example work with a building’s approach experience. This describes how the structure reveals itself over time...

Purpose Identity Meaningfulness Satisfaction

Here’s my current way to think about the four related concepts of Purpose, Identity, Meaningfulness, and Satisfaction. I find the delineation between Self (Corporate Strategy level) and Social (Job Roles level) particularly useful – separating Purpose from...
Pineapple upside down loyalty programme

Pineapple upside down loyalty programme

The old way of selling: Entice buying with promises, claims or discounts. Sales material and people are shiny and glossy. Promises are grandiose and often just shy of too-good-to-be-true. There are loyalty programmes too: The more you buy, the more you are rewarded....

Businesses don’t care. Individuals do.

In many countries, businesses (and other organisations) are legal entities like individual humans. Many have inspiring, socially-aware brand values, caring cultures and strict codes of ethical conduct. At the end of the day, however, the expression of caring comes...
Service and money

Service and money

Real service is what you cannot measure with money. “To give real service you must add something which cannot be bought or measured with money, and that is sincerity and integrity.” — Douglas Adams And a business focused on service (not profits) will have the...

China – service differentiation

This is a follow-on post from China the Ikea of businesses. Differentiation by service: make a same-same product but pair it with specialised and targeted services that become the core differentiator. ALong the lines of moving from things to thinking/service. To...

Cheap and disrespectful

Coincidentally after my post yesterday on the lack of respect for professionals by professionals – Looking for a real professional who charges a low price – I was pointed to the Freelancer site. On sites like this, punters post jobs across a variety of categories like...

“Looking for a real professional who charges a low price”

Have you ever been asked this? It may seem like an innocent question at first glance. But is it? Underlying this question is a lack of respect and trust. We all want to work with the best people. We all prefer to pay a good price. And we all know there is a limit to...

Devices don’t matter as much now

Most people seem to use technology in broadly similar ways these days. Surf the web, deal with email, watch YouTube, get on Facebook and other social sites, and some basic to intermediate Office-y stuff. It doesn’t really matter whether this is on a smartphone,...

Building trust in processes

Many factors conspire to erode our trust in the processes we inevitably have to deal with every day. We are increasingly divorced from the acts of getting things done/made/grown as we build layers upon layers of abstraction between us the consumers and the producers....

Trust of systems

When we use complex systems like computers, repeated consistent behaviours (of the system) over time builds up our trust in the system. In the same way, the more inconsistencies or oddities that we experience over time, however insignificant, the more our trust in the...

Reduce options, increase sales

More choice is not always a good thing because it can overwhelm your customers and discourage them from making a decision. If you offer a large range of product choices, especially if some of those choices are not immediately differentiated from each other; help...

Making things useful

If something is detachable or is a removable option, it will likely never be available when you need it. I seldom have my USB webcam with my laptop when I need it. My laptop’s removable optical drive is always removed (to reduce the weight); the same goes for my...
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