Posts in category: Design

What’s your problem?

Designers love a good problem to chew on. Design is by its nature a problem solving activity. How can we make something better? How can we make a process less painful and more effective? How can we make a space both beautiful and useful? I get bored when I don’t...
Fashion changes

Fashion changes

I snapped this outside a Westfield last month. Fashion changes. That is the whole point. So what? We may be tempted to dismiss this as more vacuous advertising noise, assuming we even notice it in the first place. If we think about this just a little bit (which is...

Perceiving others’ pain

Pain is relative. The experience of pain is subjective to each individual.This can make it really hard for us to understand another person’s pain. We tend to gauge their pain by imagining how we would feel in the same situation. This is inevitably flawed as we can...

Making a mark in a world of slim

It must be really hard to be an electronics product designer at the moment. Consider the plethora of same-same looking television sets at the moment. The primary opportunity for visual differentiation/expression seems to be increasingly limited to the stand. Images...

Easy to use

Just what does “easy to use” mean? Easy to use is relative. To the user’s experience, skill, culture, knowledge and environments. When stakeholders says easy to use, we need to be mindful of where they are coming from. The easiest to use nuclear...

UX/UI for internal vs public users

The UX/UI design context can vary depending on whether the expected end users of a given application are internal staff or the general public. INTERNAL (Specialised) Users PUBLIC (External) Users Example:Tax Office intranet audit application. Example:Web-based income...

UI, UX, IA and gamification in context

Everything we use – including software applications, machinery/equipment, and processes/services – has a User Experience (UX) component. The user experience of a product or service is what the user feels, thinks and experiences in the course of interacting with this...

Three elements of a UX use-context

There are three aspects we need to consider when reviewing a use context. How the design addresses these elements will directly affect the user experience of the product or service. Physical The physical environment, the physical ability of the user, and the physical...

Co-design vs design by committee

Co-design is not the same as design by committee. There are similarities. Especially in the wide stakeholder consultation/involvement. Co-design: There is still a designer (or a design tean with a design lead) who makes experience and expertise driven decisions...
User-centred design mindset

User-centred design mindset

Underlying any effective user-centred designer is the fundamental desire to be of service. Understanding derived from empathy drives truly insightful requirements gathering. What is it really like for the user? How do they feel? What do they want? What are they afraid...
Design seesaw

Design seesaw

When designing a service, product, or software application, there are often these four aspects to balance.
Designing for damage tolerance

Designing for damage tolerance

Given the nature of the material (cereal), and the packaging/use-context; it is not hard to see how the position of the five holes could lead to such unhappy breakages. Funny and cute aside, this is a good reminder of how we could better anticipate likely problems...

Manifesting UX

The user experience (of a product or service) manifests through three aspects: the user interface (UI), the information architecture (IA) and the presentation design (PD). UX User Experience UIUser Interface IAInformation Architecture PDPresentation Design Means...

UI design vs user training

We consciously design applications and info systems to suit our needs and proclivities. In the course of using a system, we also modify our behaviour to accommodate the system; such as learning the keyboard shortcuts. Improving a user interface is an on-going dynamic...
Clustering

Clustering

Here’s a way to visualise the clustering (affinity) process used to sort large amounts of information into core themes; to enable understanding, and guide solution development. Here’s an information architecture example I whipped up. Clustering provides greater...
Unbox and reveal in UX design

Unbox and reveal in UX design

What the user experiences when unwrapping a product is part and parcel of the product/brand’s total user experience. Image from Wikimedia.org Architects for example work with a building’s approach experience. This describes how the structure reveals itself over time...
Analogue fault-tolerance

Analogue fault-tolerance

Analogue TV broadcasting is about to be switched off Australia-wide. One thing digital TV still can’t beat analogue is the latter’s unsurpassed ability to remain watchable even in less-than-ideal conditions. With analogue, a signal often has to completely cut out for...
My ideal phone

My ideal phone

I have been very happy using my Samsung Galaxy SII for over a year now. Recently I went back to the old Nokia C6 while the Galaxy is having its cracked screen replaced. Despite having taken to the Galaxy’s touch Swype keyboard better than I had ever imagined, I...

A matter of will

A process of structured creative thinking (design thinking) + deep generalists is a powerful combination to deal with change. If we can consciously train people to use such a process, and value people who can think this way, then we can only be that much better...

Design thinking without design

Can we teach design thinking without teaching design? Is it possible to separate out the design thinking as a structured creative problem solving tool applicable to any and every profession, much like critical thinking, literacy and numeracy?
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